This last year has been a great time for my ‘personal growth.’ I do feel a bit gross saying that but there it is.

Feminism, at its core, is about equality. In patriarchal society women have been , and are, at a disadvantage. How does this society also disadvantage fathers?

Before this blog turned into a big ol’ feminist party, it started off as a place for me to complain about how hard it is being a mother, but the two things aren’t completely unrelated.

At our first Raising Feminists panel, the conversation organically turned to the raising of feminist daughters. But boys need feminism too.

I haven’t written about Autism for a while. To be honest, I felt a bit of a fraud, because my son has taken such great strides this year.

I caught up on new BBC Drama The Replacement at the weekend, a show about what happens when you’re a successful career woman who goes off on maternity leave, to be replaced by a super smart , wildly enthusiastic and, possibly slightly psychotic, newcomer.

Is it possible to be a feminine Feminist? Is it possible to love pink and princess dresses and still demand gender equality? Er, yes of course it is.

Modern day parenting is often characterised by its stressful nature. Everyone is busy, not least of all the kids with their highly schedulised extra curricular activities. We all get stressed, we all get a little shouty. It’s sad , it’s tough, it’s inevitable. Isn’t it ?

February 15th saw the first motherhub event take place in the Workman’s Club in Dublin. On the panel  to discuss ‘Raising Feminists’ were Roisin Ingle (Irish Times), Senator Lynn Ruane, Dr Marie Moran (UCD Equality Studies) and Melanie Lynch (Herstory founder).

Are you the mother who always puts herself last? Who tends to everyone else’s needs before your own? You are? Well, stop it.

Reposting a blog from a few months ago, but always, unfortunately,  relevant.

Finally, finally, let joy be unconfined, finally it is February. The long hard slog that is January has come to an end and with it my self imposed make up ban.